Safe Kids Larimer County

Upcoming Events

  • Safe Kids Larimer County Meeting March 2, 2017 at 9:00 am – 10:30 am Locations Vary...check web site
  • Salud Car Seat Class March 7, 2017 at 5:00 pm – 6:15 pm Salud Family Health Centers, 1635 Blue Spruce Dr, Fort Collins, CO 80524, USA Call 495.7508 to register. One seat per family per year. $30 donation.
  • Safe Kids Coalition Meeting March 9, 2017 at 9:00 am – 10:30 am Locations Vary...check web site Locations Vary...check web site
  • Loveland Fire Station #6 Car Seat Class March 21, 2017 at 4:00 pm – 5:15 pm Loveland Fire Station 6, 4325 McWhinney Blvd, Loveland, CO 80538, USA Call 495.7508 to register. One seat per family per year. $30 donation.

Car Seat Educational Videos – Arabic, English and French

Do you work with families (or are a family!) who speaks Arabic or French? Child Safety Link has uploaded multiple car seat educational videos in Arabic, English and French. Click here for their YouTube channel link. Or view the first video in the series below:

Join us for Get Dumped Day!

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Come out on Sunday, February 12th between Noon and 2 p.m. at Colorado State Patrol (3832 S. I-25) to dump your old car seats!

Around Valentine’s Day our thoughts turn to our loved ones, especially our children. Safe Kids Larimer County urges parents and caregivers to ensure their children are riding as safely as possible by dumping their old, unsafe car seats and boosters.

Car Seats Colorado provides a pod to place recalled, expired and/or crashed car seats. These seats are then taken to be recycled.

Click here to open event flyer.

Recycling Pod at CSP

Although we’d love to see you at the awareness event, the pod stays at this location year round and old car seats can be dropped off  Monday – Friday between 8-4:30 p.m.

AAP Updates Safe Sleep Recommendations for Infants

Every year, the nation loses roughly 3,500 babies to sleep-related deaths. 90% of these occur before 6 months of age. The American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) continue to study and come out with recommendations on the best practices they know of to prevent these deaths. This October, they updated their recommendations to align with what they have seen in recent studies.

There were very few big changes but one that stood out was their emphasis on not sleeping with the infant on a couch or recliner. Many deaths they see are from the children becoming wedged in between cushions where they cannot escape and suffocate. Although bed sharing is still not recommended, it is safer than a couch or recliner. Especially if pillows and blankets are removed.

The ABC’s of Sleep – Alone, Back and Crib Environment are still as pertinent as ever. One update we saw was the recommendation that the infant should sleep in the same room as the parents, as close to the bed as possible, but in their own space meant for an infant. They recommend doing this until at least 6 months but up to a year if possible.

Finally, they continue to encourage no positioning devices since there is no FDA approved device that prevents SIDS, even if it says it is tested. Although it seems cold, there should be no soft objects or loose bedding in the crib/play yard/bassinet when baby is in it. A sleep sack is the safest option.

Here is the list in it’s entirety:

1. Place infants on their back to sleep (supine) for every sleep period until they are 1 year old. This position does not increase the risk of choking and aspiration.
2. Use a firm sleep surface.
3. Breastfeeding is recommended.
4. Infants should sleep in the parents’ room, close to the parents’ bed but on a separate surface designed for infants, ideally for the first year, but at least for the first six months.
5. Keep soft objects and loose bedding out of the infant’s sleep area.
6. Consider offering a pacifier at naptime and bedtime.
7. Avoid smoke exposure during pregnancy and after birth.
8. Avoid alcohol and illicit drug use during pregnancy and after birth.
9. Avoid overheating and head covering in infants.
10. Pregnant women should obtain regular prenatal care.
11. Infants should be immunized according to the recommended schedule.
12. Avoid using commercial devices that are inconsistent with safe sleep recommendations, such as wedges and positioners.
13. Don’t use home cardiorespiratory monitors as a strategy to reduce SIDS risk.
14. Supervised tummy time while the infant is awake can help development and minimize positional plagiocephaly.
15. There is no evidence to recommend swaddling to reduce the risk of SIDS.
16. Health care professionals and staff in newborn nurseries and neonatal intensive care units as well as child care providers should endorse and model recommendations to reduce SIDS risk.
17. Media and manufacturers should follow safe sleep guidelines in messaging and advertising.
18. Continue the Safe to Sleep campaign, focusing on ways to further reduce sleep-related deaths.
19. Research and surveillance should continue on all risk factors.
Found at: http://www.aappublications.org/news/2016/10/24/SIDS102416

Partner Highlight – Berthoud Fire Protection District

Safe Kids Larimer County has been in existence since 1998, first led by the Larimer County Health Department and led by UCHealth since 2002.  We work closely with a number of community businesses, agencies, and organizations to expand our reach to reduce accidental injury to children birth to 19 years of age.

We are so thankful for the support and programs Berthoud Fire Protection District offers for their town. For a smaller town, they have a big heart and care deeply about the safety of their community. We received a grant from Safe Kids Worldwide for Home Fire Drill Day and Berthoud Fire took the materials and put on a fun and educational open house for families. Our reach would not travel as far if it was not for their support. Thank you, Berthoud Fire!

‘The Berthoud Fire Protection District is responsible for fire protection, Emergency Medical Services, public fire education, and prevention duties for an area of 98 square miles within Larimer, Boulder, and Weld counties. Their mission statement is “To Serve, To Care, To Support”. 

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Partner Highlight – Loveland Police Department

Safe Kids Larimer County has been in existence since 1998, first led by the Larimer County Health Department and led by UCHealth since 2002.  We work closely with a number of community businesses, agencies, and organizations to expand our reach to reduce accidental injury to children birth to 19 years of age.

The month of November is a great time to sit back and take note of what you are thankful for. This month, Safe Kids is thankful for the partnership we have with the Loveland Police Department. Their programs model a department who cares for the safety and wellbeing of their community.

Our collaboration with them at the Loveland Museum Halloween Family Fun Festival is always a blast handing out roughly 800 reflective bags for the children to use trick or treating. There is also their generous senior volunteers who worked with us and Alexa’s Hugs during a busy Car Seat Inspection Event in August. We also cannot love on the Santa Cops program enough! Thank you, Loveland PD, for your commitment to your community.

‘The mission of the Loveland Police Department is to provide an enhanced level of safety in our city, protect the rights guaranteed to all people by the constitution, and improve the quality of life of each person.’

Image result for loveland pd

 

Safe Kids Partner Highlight – PEDAL Club and The Egg & I

Safe Kids Larimer County has been in existence since 1998, first led by the Larimer County Health Department and led by UCHealth since 2002.  We work closely with a number of community businesses, agencies, and organizations to expand our reach to reduce accidental injury to children birth to 19 years of age.

This month, we would like to thank the PEDAL Club and the Egg & I for their support of our bicycle helmet program. The PEDAL Club recently biked to the 4 different Egg & I restaurants in Loveland and Fort Collins to raise money for us to buy additional helmets. The Egg & I also donated 25% of kid’s meals purchased that day to Safe Kids. Together, they raised over $350 which equates to more than 35 helmets we can buy and distribute to children in our community.

The PEDAL Club also works hard to educate the community through programs and presentations on bicycle laws and the importance of helmet use. Their passion for bicycling can be seen on the streets of Loveland and in their presentations to the community.

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About our partners:

The PEDAL Club, or People’s Efforts to De-emphasize Automobiles in Loveland, was founded in 1970 by Joe Brockstein, Jim Disney, Art Minnick and Darrel Smith. They provide organized bicycle rides, do educational presentations and work with the city to create safe and practical bicycle infrastructure.

The Egg & I restaurant was born in Fort Collins in 1987 by Rayno and Patty Seaser. There are now 92 restaurants throughout the country.

Safe Kids Partner Highlight – CSU Police Department

Safe Kids Larimer County has been in existence since 1998, first led by the Larimer County Health Department and led by UCHealth since 2002.  We work closely with a number of community businesses, agencies, and organizations to expand our reach to reduce accidental injury to children birth to 19 years of age.

This month, we would like to thank the Colorado State University Police Department. Since Safe Kids has increased the ages we work with from 14 to 19 years of age, CSU PD has been a great partner to collaborate with.  In August, we worked closely with them and the CSU alternative transportations department to put 250 bicycle helmets on the heads of incoming freshman.

Their commitment to keeping their students safe from injury is incredible to watch.From educational activities to providing the students with the helmets at no cost, the campus is a safer place because of the police department and alternative transportation. We appreciate their support and hard work!

The Colorado State University Police Department’s mission is: ‘To promote a safe and secure community while providing proactive police services through education, outreach and response.’

Safe Kids Partner Highlight – Colorado State Patrol

Safe Kids Larimer County has been in existence since 1998, first led by the Larimer County Health Department and led by UCHealth since 2002.  We work closely with a number of community businesses, agencies, and organizations to expand our reach to reduce accidental injury to children birth to 19 years of age.

This month, we would like to thank the Colorado State Patrol for all they do to help Safe Kids Larimer County. Not only is one of their own on our Board, but they are one of our permanent car seat inspection stations, allow us to store our car seats for classes AND have taken on the car seat recycling program for the state.

Many of our programs would not run as smoothly as they do if it wasn’t for the time and space they donate to Safe Kids. We appreciate their partnership and support as we educate and empower children and families with injury prevention awareness.

The Colorado State Patrol was founded in 1935 and their mission is: ‘To ensure a safe and secure environment for all persons by utilizing the strengths of our members to provide professional law enforcement services that reflect our core values of Honor, Duty and Respect.’

Safe Kids Partner Highlight–Alexa’s Hugs

Safe Kids Larimer County has been in existence since 1998, first led by the Larimer County Health Department and led by UCHealth since 2002.  We work closely with a number of community businesses, agencies, and organizations to expand our reach to reduce accidental injury to children birth to 19 years of age.  For years Safe Kids’ focus was through age 14 and was primarily targeting child passenger safety.  We have expanded to include teen drivers and would like to highlight an organization who is helping us accomplish our mission of reaching the teens with safety messages: Alexa’s Hugs

Alexa’s Hugs began from a tragedy in 2013 when a beautiful, vibrant, and loving 19 year-old, Alexa,  lost her life due to fatigue, distraction, speed, weather, and not buckling up.  Her parents, Tad and Jona Johnson decided to turn their grief and the tragedy they faced into something positive.  They did not want another family to experience what they went through and started Alexa’s Hugs, a non-profit dedicated to educating teens to make good choices and provide positive encouragement for seat belt use, among other teen driving issues.

Alexa’s Hugs and Safe Kids joined forces, with the help of UCHealth, to obtain a 3-year Colorado Department of Transportation (CDOT) grant to engage high schools in seat belt challenges and messaging.  In our first year working together (Alexa’s Hugs had been in the high schools for 2 years prior) we were able to work with ten (10) schools in six school districts to assist them in developing their own safety campaigns.  Pre- and post-seat belt observations were done by Alexa’s Hugs and volunteers where we saw an 11.5% increase in seat belt use!  A little positive messaging and encouragement from peers goes a long way!

For more information on the results of the high school challenge, visit http://www.alexahugs.com/schools/2015-2016-seat-belt-challenge/.

We are proud to partner with Alexa’s Hugs to address teen driving injuries and fatalities and we look forward to this year’s challenge.

Alexas-Hugs

Kids in Hot Cars Don’t Mix

As I write this there have been 9 childhood deaths related to being left in a hot vehicle.  It doesn’t even have to be that hot outside for the inside of the vehicle to heat up quickly.  To help prevent heat-related deaths remember to ACT:

A: Avoid heatstroke-related injury and death by never leaving your child alone in a car, not even for a minute. And make sure to keep your car locked when you’re not in it so kids don’t get in on their own.

C: Create reminders by putting something in the back of your car next to your child such as a briefcase, a purse or a cell phone that is needed at your final destination. This is especially important if you’re not following your normal routine.

T: Take action. If you see a child alone in a car, call 911. Emergency personnel want you to call. They are trained to respond to these situations. One call could save a life.

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