Keep Medications Up and Away

Today’s world is a fast-moving and busy place. Parents often struggle to balance competing demands while working hard to make safe and healthy choices for their families. With more medicines in the home than ever before, parents face increasing challenges to protect their children from accidental medicine poisonings.

Every day, poison control centers get a call almost once a minute because a young child got into medicine and emergency departments see enough children each day to fill roughly four school buses for the same reason.

You wouldn’t rely on only telling toddlers to stay away from pools to protect them from drowning, and it’s the same with medicine. Young children are naturally impulsive, and parents can’t rely on just talking to them about the dangers of medicine.

Here are some steps your family can take to keep young children safe from accidental poisoning:

Store all medicine up and away and out of sight and reach every time.

Safe medicine storage means out of sight and out of reach, not one or the other. To be safe, medicine should be stored out of sight in a cabinet or drawer where children can’t see it and out of reach (at or above counter height).

Keep medicine in its original child-resistant packaging. If you or another family member do choose to use a pill organizer or baggie to help manage taking medicine, make sure you always store it up and away and out of sight and reach.

Practice safe storage of medicine as soon as your first child is born. Babies as young as 3 weeks of age have ended up in the emergency department after getting into medicine left within reach.

Put the Poison Help number – 1-800-222-1222 – into your phone and post it visibly at home.

Instead of keeping medicine handy, use safe reminder tools to help you remember when to take and give doses.

Set an alarm on your watch or cell phone or write a note to yourself and leave it somewhere you look often, like on the refrigerator door. Try combining taking daily medicines with a daily task like brushing your teeth or using a medication schedule card.

Dump those old car seats this Valentine’s Day!

It is that time of year to break up with your old car seats. It isn’t you, it is them – they aren’t safe. You can’t just be friends and pass by them in your garage hoping to rekindle a connection later. Make the promise to dump them once and for all! Below are a couple of options to help you keep this promise.

  1. Recycle them at Colorado State Patrol office (3832 S. I-25, Fort Collins). Bring them Monday-Friday from 8 a.m.-4 p.m. Car Seats Colorado has provided a storage pod so let’s fill it up! No need to strip the car seats.
  2. Loveland Recycling Center recycles car seats for Loveland residents. Please strip them of all pieces.
  3. Cut the straps and toss them in the trash.

Don’t forget to learn how to use your new car seats! Read the manual and make a free appointment with a certified car seat technician. Find a list of techs in Larimer and Weld County here!

A Resolution for Safety

Happy New Year and new decade! Wow, I cannot believe I am saying that. I enjoy this time of year as it allows me to step back and look at the accomplishments, big and small, over the last year plus all of the joys to come in this year.

Subsequently, my mind often goes wild with all of the New Years resolutions I can make. There are so many options; take up a new hobby, volunteer more, complain less. To a point where it can get overwhelming.

One resolution that is always worth making, and keeping, is protecting my family from accidental injuries. This can also be daunting unless wrapping everyone in bubble wrap is an option.

Safe Kids Worldwide has come up with a solution. It is called My High 5. They know how much safety advice is out there and figuring out what is relevant can be tough. With their My High 5 you are able to pick and choose what is important to you and your family.

Check it out and pick your top 5 safety priorities. Not only will you feel accomplished but also your mind will be set at ease that your family is that much safer. Start the year off right with a committment to safety.

Click the picture below or here to get started!

Taking Care of Grandchildren

Being a grandparent is one of the most rewarding parts of getting older. As new research is constantly being done and new technology appears, things have changed since raising kids yourself. For example, car seats used to be used to keep kids out of the drivers seat, not necessarily to keep them safe. The great thing is that due to this research and technology, childhood deaths due to accidental injuries have been cut in half over the last 30 years! Here are a few reminders to keep your grandbabies safe while in your care are:

  • Keep your medications out of reach. Many medications look like candy to young children and can be misused by curious teens. When visiting or if they come over, go ahead and put your medications somewhere safe. If you keep them in your purse, put your purse out of reach.
  • Get their car seat inspected. 90% of car seats are used incorrectly. Go to an inspection station and have them teach you how to install the car seat properly – they can even show you how the child should be properly restrained in the seat! To find inspection stations near you, head to our inspection station list here
  • Put baby back to sleep. Any time an infant is sleeping, put them down on their back on a flat surface such as a crib or playpen. This is one of the proven ways we can help prevent sudden infant death syndrome, or SIDS. Also, make sure they are in their own sleeping space, are not covered with blankets (usually a sleep sack will work best so it can not cover their face while they sleep but can stay warm) and do not let them sleep with stuffed animals or other fluffy items in the bed.

Pedestrian Safety

Whether your kids are walking to school, the park or a friend’s house, here are a few simple tips to make sure they get there safely.

The Hard Facts

Unintentional pedestrian injuries are the fifth leading cause of injury-related death in the United States for children ages 5 to 19. Teenagers are now at greatest risk.

Top Tips

  1. Teach kids at an early age to look left, right and left again before crossing the street. Then remind them to continue looking until safely across.
  2. Teach kids to put phones, headphones and devices down when crossing the street. It is particularly important to reinforce this message with teenagers.
  3. It’s always best to walk on sidewalks or paths and cross at street corners, using traffic signals and crosswalks. If there are no sidewalks, walk facing traffic as far to the left as possible. 
  4. Children under 10 need to cross the street with an adult. Every child is different, but developmentally, most kids are unable to judge the speed and distance of oncoming cars until age 10.
  5. Be a good role model. Set a good example by putting your phone, headphones and devices down when walking around cars.
  6. If kids are walking when it’s dark out, teach them to be especially alert and make sure they are visible to drivers. Have them wear light- or brightly colored clothing and reflective gear.

Appreciate the crossing guards at your child’s school? Nominate them for America’s Favorite Crossing Guard here.