Celebrating Safe Kids Week

Safe Kids Larimer County Celebrates Safe Kids Week with Resources to Help Parents Protect Kids from Preventable Injuries

Safety Advocates Unite to Remind Busy Parents to Take Time to Focus on Simple Steps to Keep Kids Safe at Home, at Play, and on the Way

In honor of Safe Kids Week (May 8-14), Safe Kids Larimer County, based at UCHealth, is providing tips, resources, and activities to educate parents and caregivers about simple ways to keep their kids safe from a range of preventable injuries.

At a time when parents are focused on many priorities at once, Safe Kids Week is a national celebration dedicated to celebrating kids, raising awareness about child injury prevention, and inspiring parents to take the time to focus on proven and practical tips to keep their kids safe. 

Preventable injuries are the number one cause of death of children in the United States, and millions more are injured in ways that can affect them for a lifetime.

“Safe Kids Week is a wonderful opportunity for Larimer County residents to celebrate kids, learn about how to keep them safe and, ultimately, save lives,” says Alison Weston, Safe Kids Coordinator. “This is a week where we can all take just a little bit of time out of our busy schedules to focus on a few simple steps that can make a big difference in the safety of our children.”  

To support parents and caregivers, Safe Kids Larimer County is offering helpful resources, including:

  • Parent’s Guide to Child Safety – a comprehensive 24-page guide with expert advice and easy-to-follow tips to help families reduce risks, prevent injuries and keep kids safe at home, at play and on the road. Available in English and Spanish.
  • Family Safety Activity Book – a fun booklet that includes a maze, word search, coloring pages, puzzles, and other exciting games to keep you and your kids ages 4-8 entertained and safe. Available in English and Spanish.
  • Home Safety Graphic – an interactive graphic that takes parents room by room to show useful tips on how to keep their kids safe no matter where they live.

Preventing Carbon Monoxide Poisoning

As we begin to utilize items to keep us warm this winter, please check the batteries in your Carbon Monoxide (CO) detector to make sure it is working properly. It is always advised to have a battery-powered CO alarm, and this can help to lower the chance of casualties or accidents. Each year 430 people die in the U.S. as a result of accidental CO poisoning, and the truth is that many of these accidents could have been prevented.

Carbon Monoxide is an odorless, poisonous and tasteless gas, which is why it is so harmful. CO is typically found in furnaces, vehicles, stoves, gas rangers, generators and from burning wood or charcoal. The CO from these items can build up in rooms or spaces without enough ventilation, leading to those in these areas at risk for poisoning. Aside from the risks or harms of CO, the positive side is that this is preventable. There are both DO’s and DON’T’s when it comes to preventing CO exposure, and I will give you some tips to keep you and your loved ones safe.

To Prevent Carbon Monoxide Poisoning

DO’s:

  • Install a battery-powered CO detector in your home. If you already have CO detectors, be sure to check that the battery is still working, and if not be sure to change them.
  • Have a qualified technician check you water heater, heating system, and any gas, coal, or oil burning appliances. This should be done every year to ensure that they are functioning correctly and are not at risk for malfunctioning.
  • If your CO detector makes any sort of noise, immediately exit your home and call 911. If there was a potential exposure make sure that you and others are examined by medical professionals, especially if you are experiencing light-headedness, dizziness, or nausea.

DON’T’s:

  • Use or burn anything on a stove or fireplace that doesn’t have proper ventilation, as this can cause a build-up of CO.
  • Heat your house with a gas oven, as this can cause a high production of CO.
  • Run cars or trucks inside a garage that is attached to your living spaces, even if you have doors or windows open.
  • Use a camp stove, generator or charcoal grill in or outside of your home less than 20 feet away from doors, vents or windows.

Carbon Monoxide poisoning is preventable, but you have to be sure to take the time to make sure that your home and the items you are using are safe. It is easy to make a small mistake that has everlasting consequences. Take time out of your day to take action on these CO poisoning DO’s and DON’T’s to better protect yourself and those around you.

5 Tips for a Safer Thanksgiving Day

Thanksgiving for many is the optimal chance to spend time with family and reflect on all that they are thankful for. Alongside the joy of this day, there is also a list of tasks to be completed, long lists for the grocery store and an extensive amount of preparation to be done prior. Not only do you need to prepare for the meals you will be cooking, but there are also other areas in which you should prepare for; safe cooking and protecting the children who are around you. Between the constant hustle and bustle of this day there are hot items in the kitchen, adults running around and the need for a close eye to make sure everyone is safe. Let’s keep the thrill of Thanksgiving and submerging yourself in time with your family by going over safety tips for cooking on this day!


Quick reminders to help keep you and your family safe!

  1. Keep children out of the kitchen, although this may be hard it can keep from children being exposed to potential burns, or accidents. You can do this by creating a line with tape or other items and being sure to tell the children they need to stay behind it, for their safety. If you do allow for older children to help, make sure that they are accompanied by an adult at all times.
  2. Test your fire alarms. Prior to beginning all of the prepping and cooking, make sure that your fire alarms work. Not only should you double check them the day of Thanksgiving, but you should also check them regularly.
  3. Stay in the kitchen when you are cooking. It only takes a second for an accident to happen or for something to catch fire. If you need to step away from the kitchen when you are cooking food, ask an adult nearby to take over.
  4. Use the back burners of a stove and turn the handles away from the edges of the stove. If children do find themselves in the kitchen, they may be tempted to touch the stove or grab a pan that is hanging over the edge of the stove, and this can cause serious injuries. If you need to use all burners, try using larger pots on the edge with handles that are smaller and higher.
  5. Keep the floors clean. It may be hard to keep the floors free from clutter, but it is important to do your best on a day like this. When there are people going in and out of the kitchen it can be easy to trip over items that are on the floor and cause an injury. This day is a time to enjoy the presence of those you love and make long lasting memories. To help keep the day as seamless as can be, (aside from all of the cooking madness) enlist the help of these safety tips. Not only can you make sure that you and other adults are kept safe, the children you share this day with can also be protected.

Have a happy Thanksgiving filled with full stomachs, full hearts and most importantly, safety!

Travel Safety Tips

Travel Safety Tips

It is no surprise that after being at home for quite some time due to coronavirus, many people are jumping at the chance to catch a flight or hit the road and venture out. There may also be other reasons for traveling, such as the need to see your family, or even work. Regardless of the reason, if you do, it is more important than ever before to take extra steps to be safe.

It is important to acknowledge that the CDC recommends staying home over any sort of travel.

Prior to Traveling, there are a few safety steps to take.

  • Let a trust-worthy neighbor know your plans so that they can keep an eye out for your house. Also, be sure to lock all doors, windows and close your garage.
  • Be sure not to post your travel plans to social media prior, as this can alert burglars to know when you will be out of town and potentially lead to a break in.
  • If you have packages being delivered, try and get them delivered to a friend or family members, to lessen the chance of them being stolen.
  • Meet with a certified car seat technician. If you are traveling with young children it is always a good idea to get your car seats checked out to ensure proper install and harnessing. Proper use of a car seat can decrease the risk of injury and death up to 74%. It is worth taking the 30 minutes with a trained professional to put your mind at ease. Find a local technician today.

In Action Travel Safety for Kids

  • Pack sanitizing wipes, sanitizer, and be sure to wash your hands! Having wipes can allow for you to sanitize items you or your children have touched or might use. At any chance you have, take a break to wash your hands.
  • Bring a car seat! You may be driving or flying, and kids who require car sears will need to have them on vacation, no exceptions. There are alternative seats such as lightweight car seats if you will be switching planes or cars often.
  • Teach your children to stay nearby. When traveling you may be in unfamiliar places, and it is important your kids stay near an adult at times. Have them dress in bright clothing to make it easier to see them. Take the time before traveling to explain to your children how they need to stay close by to make sure they are safe.

Road Trip Safety Tips

  • Give your car a once-over. Before hitting the road, make sure to check your entire car. Make sure there are no safety hazards, no service lights on, you can see through all mirrors and that the tire pressure is not low.
  • Buckle up! We may think that buckling up before hitting the road is common sense but check to make sure all seat belts are properly working and that any car seats are properly installed. This is an easy area to overlook but can save a life.
  • Take turns driving. When driving long distances, it is no surprise that you may find yourself tired. Having another person to alternate driving with can keep your more alert, leading to safer travels.

Taking trips with your family means new memories, new experiences and all-around fun times. Planning ahead and making sure you are prepared will keep both you and your family safer!

Beating Summer Heat

Before summer presents itself, the temperatures begin rising and the summer activities begin taking place, it is important to know that people are at risk for developing heat stress. This can happen to anyone, including children, older adults, those working outside and those with medical conditions.

What is heat stress? It is important to know the difference between heat strokes and heat exhaustion. The two are both serious issues, yet one may require more serious medical attention. Heat stroke may occur when the body is unable to cool itself and maintain a normal level of temperature.

Heat exhaustion may present itself with light-headedness, nausea, fatigue, muscle cramping and dizziness. Being able to recognize these signs is imperative to treating them. If one presents with these symptoms try to take these steps in lowering body temperature and cooling the body.

  • Remove tight or extra clothing layers
  • Move to an open or air-conditioned place
  • Take a cold shower or use a cold compress
  • Drink fluids and electrolytes

Heat stroke is a condition that requires medical attention immediately. The common symptoms of heat stroke may include headache, rapid heart rate, confusion, nausea or vomiting, no sweating, and possibly losing consciousness. As soon as these symptoms occur it is crucial that these steps are taken.

  • Call 911 right away
  • Move the individual to a cooler area
  • Use cold compresses to help cool their body temperature
  • Do not give or intake fluids

As a parent there are different precautions that you can take to lower the risk of your child experiencing this. When playing outside or engaging in activity be sure to take frequent water breaks. Wearing clothing that is not dark in color, heavy, or moisture retaining can help. When going outside try to plan activities at times the sun is not at its peak, or as the temperature is lowering.

If someone is experiencing heat stroke and treatment is not provided it can lead to death. The symptoms of heat stroke are a medical emergency and will need to be treated as soon as possible. Although there is no way to entirely avoid the potential for this to happen, there are adequate ways to limit the chance as well as how to respond.